What Do Instagram, Bollywood, And Latin Have In Common?

The other day, I was bored, so I went onto Instagram and searched up Bollywood actors. Among those actors, I searched up Anushka Sharma. I was dumbfounded when I read her Instagram “bio”. In the beginning part of it, she had a Latin phrase. Below is a screenshot of it.

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It reads “illegitimi non carborundum”. I knew I had to find out more about the phrase, so I immediately Googled it. It turns out that Anushka Sharma is either a huge fan of The Handmaid’s Tale, a popular T.V. show on Hulu, or she’s just really into old school Latin jokes. If you haven’t read my previous article on The Handmaid’s Tale, I suggest you take a few seconds to do so now by clicking on the link attached to “The Handmaid’s Tale”. According to Vanity Fair, like the phrase “nolite te bastardes carborundorum”, the phrase “illegitimi non carborundum” is another fake Latin phrase. It has more or less the same meaning as “nolite te bastardes carborundorum”, which is “don’t let the bastards grind you down.

If that wasn’t enough, I also stumbled onto Anushka Sharma’s husband’s Instagram account (keep in mind that I was pretty bored at this point). OH BOY. Her husband, Virat Kohli, a well-known Indian cricketer had the phrase “Carpe diem” as his Instagram bio. Below is a screenshot of it.

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Woah. Now, the first thing that irked me was that Carpe diem was written as one word. And, if that wasn’t enough, he had a link right below it to promote an online clothing company. And, to put the cherry on top of all of that, Kohli forgot to complete the phrase! Yes, you heard that right, “Carpe diem” is NOT the whole phrase. According to Brittanica, “Carpe diem” is just the beginning of a phrase from Horace’s Odes, and the whole phrase can be translated as “pluck the day, trusting as little as possible in the next one.”

Now, I’ve always been told that “Carpe diem” means “seize the moment”, but the whole thing about not trusting the future? I’ve never seen the phrase be translated and interpreted like that. Now, the question is, does Virat Kohli know the full phrase, or is he using a commonly-used phrase for his Instagram bio? And, does Anushka Sharma know that the phrase “illegitimi non carborundum” is a fake, joke phrase for Latin students? If they don’t, it’s alright. After all, Smart People Know Latin.