Lucifer and Lux

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I have recently started watching a T.V. show on Netflix. This T.V. show, called Lucifer, is about Lucifer, also known as Satan, in Los Angeles solving homicide crimes with the L.A. Police Department, specifically with a homicide detective. He ends up with this role because he is bored with being the Lord of Hell and wants to explore his morality. The show involves a Devil, therapist, and some very crude jokes. Lucifer has quickly managed to become one of my all-time favorite TV shows simply because the show manages to never become too dark. No matter what happens, Detective Decker’s young daughter, Trixie, and Lucifer’s strange reactions manage to brighten up the plot with their silly points of views. One episode involves the L.A.P.D. interviewing 93 of Lucifer’s hookups, all while Lucifer tries to prove to his partner that he wants to be romantically involved with her. God’s ex-wife also makes an appearance in the TV show and is ultimately punished by Lucifer to remain on Earth as a human.

However, no matter what happens, Lucifer always returns to his home: Lux. Lux is a popular nightclub that is built on prime real estate and is THE happening place to be at. The nightclub is paramount to Los Angeles’ nightlife and later on in the show, a crime is committed there. What many watchers don’t know, though, is that lux is Latin for light. This is very clever wordplay from the creators of the TV show, seeing how Hell, in Christianity, encompasses flames and eternal burning.

What’re your thoughts? Have you seen any Latin in TV shows (hint: you probably have)?

Photo Credits: We Got This Covered

DIEM- Does It Even Matter

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Diem is a lifestyle brand that was created in 2013 by Phil The Mayor and Michael Nicholas. Its motto, which is Does It Even Matter, is meant to reference Carpe Diem, a phrase infamous for its mistranslation of Seize the Day. Diem promotes living for the little things, like going for a run during the sunset or doing silly things with your friends and being fully engaged in it, instead of worrying about the future. However, as Marsilio puts it, without the full phrase, the philosophical meaning behind Carpe Diem is taken away. Horace wrote “carpe diem, quam minimum credula postero”, which is translated as “pluck the day, put very little trust in tomorrow.” I found this interesting because the misconception of carpe diem is “enjoy today and tomorrow will be better”, whereas the actual denotation is meant to be to virtually get everything done today because tomorrow is uncertain.

Photo Courtesy of Diem

Somnox- High Quality Sleep?

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To be honest, I have a hard time falling asleep. I always have. However, one sleep routine that really worked for me in the summer was falling asleep on the ground on top of my giant Costco teddy bear. Not only would I fall asleep fast, but I would also wake up feeling fresh, thanks to my giant cloud. Now a company has improved and capitalized that feeling, so instead of sleeping on a big bear, you can sleep comfortably on your bed with a sleep robot.

This company is called Somnox. Somnox claims that their sleep robot “helps you sleep faster… by using breathing regulation, sounds, and affection…” (Somnox Site Page). Somnus is the Latin word for sleep; insomnia comes from that word, hence the name for the cookie store Insomnia Cookies. Nox is the Latin word for night, so Somnus + Nox means sleep [at] night. Not only did Somnox take a simple concept and build off of it, but they also used two simple Latin words to come up with their name, whereas Somnus, a potential competitor, only uses one. Genius.

 

Image courtesy of Somnox

Nestle Vitality


Yesterday, at school, I was thinking about this blog. “I need to post something this week to get back onto my schedule of posting” was one of my thoughts. Then, suddenly, my new topic was right in front of me. Literally. You see, I was drinking enhanced water from Nestlé. And what is that brand of enhanced water called? It’s called “Nestlé Vitality Enhanced Waters from the Vitality Express Dispenser”, according to the website of Nestlé. The product is illustrated as a way to “[v]italize your beverage business” (Nestlé). Vitalize and vitality have the same root from a Latin word: vita.  Vita is Latin for “life”. Words that are derived from vita are, but not limited to: vitality, vitalize, vital, vivacious, and etc. Are you mind-blown, because wow, Latin is truly everywhere.

Click here to read another post about how the Latin word, vita, ties in with gaming.

Here is another post that’s about health and vita.

 

Photo/Logo Credits: Nestlé Professional

What Do Instagram, Bollywood, And Latin Have In Common?

The other day, I was bored, so I went onto Instagram and searched up Bollywood actors. Among those actors, I searched up Anushka Sharma. I was dumbfounded when I read her Instagram “bio”. In the beginning part of it, she had a Latin phrase. Below is a screenshot of it.

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It reads “illegitimi non carborundum”. I knew I had to find out more about the phrase, so I immediately Googled it. It turns out that Anushka Sharma is either a huge fan of The Handmaid’s Tale, a popular T.V. show on Hulu, or she’s just really into old school Latin jokes. If you haven’t read my previous article on The Handmaid’s Tale, I suggest you take a few seconds to do so now by clicking on the link attached to “The Handmaid’s Tale”. According to Vanity Fair, like the phrase “nolite te bastardes carborundorum”, the phrase “illegitimi non carborundum” is another fake Latin phrase. It has more or less the same meaning as “nolite te bastardes carborundorum”, which is “don’t let the bastards grind you down.

If that wasn’t enough, I also stumbled onto Anushka Sharma’s husband’s Instagram account (keep in mind that I was pretty bored at this point). OH BOY. Her husband, Virat Kohli, a well-known Indian cricketer had the phrase “Carpe diem” as his Instagram bio. Below is a screenshot of it.

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Woah. Now, the first thing that irked me was that Carpe diem was written as one word. And, if that wasn’t enough, he had a link right below it to promote an online clothing company. And, to put the cherry on top of all of that, Kohli forgot to complete the phrase! Yes, you heard that right, “Carpe diem” is NOT the whole phrase. According to Brittanica, “Carpe diem” is just the beginning of a phrase from Horace’s Odes, and the whole phrase can be translated as “pluck the day, trusting as little as possible in the next one.”

Now, I’ve always been told that “Carpe diem” means “seize the moment”, but the whole thing about not trusting the future? I’ve never seen the phrase be translated and interpreted like that. Now, the question is, does Virat Kohli know the full phrase, or is he using a commonly-used phrase for his Instagram bio? And, does Anushka Sharma know that the phrase “illegitimi non carborundum” is a fake, joke phrase for Latin students? If they don’t, it’s alright. After all, Smart People Know Latin.

UPenn

One example of a prestigious Ivy League school is UPenn. The University of Pennsylvania is a private university that is often confused with the Pennsylvania State University, which is also known as Penn State. UPenn has a tiny acceptance rate and its school of business, Wharton, is known for being the best in the country. It’s one of dreams to get in/go there (along with UChicago and NYU). One of my friends has applied early decision for a dual medicine program, and he finds out in two days, so I’m nervous for him! UPenn’s motto is in Latin, like most prestigious schools. It reads “leges sine moribus vanae”, which means “laws without morals are useless”(UPenn Archives). UPenn’s motto has always been in Latin, but its exact words have changed over time. In 1956, a group of faculty members recognized that the authentic motto came from Horace’s Odes, and out of respect, it would not be changed anymore. The motto has not been changed since.

Is Pseudo-Latin Actually A Thing?

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Believe it or not, pseudo-Latin is a thing. In fact, you’ve probably already seen it. Lorem Ipsum is known as pseudo-Latin. Lorem Ipsum is a dummy text which is used to fill in documents and websites, so the viewers and editors can pay more attention to the format and layout. Today, a lot of websites and desktop publishing softwares use Lorem Ipsum to fill in blank spaces.  However, contrary to popular belief, Lorem Ipsum is not scrambled words and randomized text¹. The text in Lorem Ipsum originates from one of Cicero’s works. So, does that make Lorem Ipsum real Latin or pseudo-Latin?

¹ Even though Lorem Ipsum resembles Latin, the text has no meaning. The letters k, w, and z don’t exist in Latin, so similar words are inserted in their place.