Drink Hydra from Hydro Flask

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If you make your way down to a high school on the Northeast Coast of the United States, you will stumble upon a new popular trend: Hydro Flask bottles covered with memes from The Office and cheesy quotes about persistence, all bought from RedBubble. Although aesthetic-looking, the bottles dent quite easily. This is widely disappointing because Hydro Flask bottles retail for $39.95 each. However, that is a well-known fact that most people choose to ignore. One factoid not many people know is that Hydra is Latin for water-serpent. Besides that? Hydraulus is Latin for water organ, or a pipe organ powered by water. The similarity? Both words have a prefix of hydra- and have something do with water. Hydro Flask can also be known as a flask where you carry/drink water from. Coincidence? I think not.

The Usage Of Latin Words Is Increasing For Naming New Start-Up Companies

Do you want to buy a precious coin for you or a loved one? Do you want to sell your old baseball cards? Are you looking to buy stamps to complete your, or someone else’s, card collection? Well, one online marketplace that you can use to search for these things is Mercari. Mercari is he largest online marketplace to buy and sell goods in Japan, according to LinkedIn. It was created by Ryo Ishizuka, Shintaro Yamada, and Tommy Tomishima. You can read more about Mercari here. Mercari is used to buy and sell almost anything in a quick and easy manner. The word mercari is a Latin word, which means “I bought”. Other words that are derived from mercari are, but not limited to: merchant, Mercury, merchandise, merchandising, and etc. Coding apps and creating new things in the digital world are becoming more and more popular; the usage of Latin words is increasing for naming these new startups.

Picture Credit: Schimiggy

Nestle Vitality


Yesterday, at school, I was thinking about this blog. “I need to post something this week to get back onto my schedule of posting” was one of my thoughts. Then, suddenly, my new topic was right in front of me. Literally. You see, I was drinking enhanced water from Nestlé. And what is that brand of enhanced water called? It’s called “Nestlé Vitality Enhanced Waters from the Vitality Express Dispenser”, according to the website of Nestlé. The product is illustrated as a way to “[v]italize your beverage business” (Nestlé). Vitalize and vitality have the same root from a Latin word: vita.  Vita is Latin for “life”. Words that are derived from vita are, but not limited to: vitality, vitalize, vital, vivacious, and etc. Are you mind-blown, because wow, Latin is truly everywhere.

Click here to read another post about how the Latin word, vita, ties in with gaming.

Here is another post that’s about health and vita.

 

Photo/Logo Credits: Nestlé Professional

This Is How Latin Influenced Gaming

The Sony PlayStation Vita is a hand-held gaming device. According to Amazon, the PS Vita offers a “more immersive gaming experience”, where the player can play from anywhere, ranging from their couch to a restaurant. What’s this got to do with Latin? Well, the word vita is a Latin word which means life, career, and/or livelihood. Basically, you, or anyone else, can play on the PS Vita anywhere, at any moment of your daily life. And, did you know that video gaming can actually be like a career, if you get enough followers willing donate money to you? If you made your video gaming hobby into a career, I’d have to call that your source of income for your livelihood.

 

What Do Instagram, Bollywood, And Latin Have In Common?

The other day, I was bored, so I went onto Instagram and searched up Bollywood actors. Among those actors, I searched up Anushka Sharma. I was dumbfounded when I read her Instagram “bio”. In the beginning part of it, she had a Latin phrase. Below is a screenshot of it.

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It reads “illegitimi non carborundum”. I knew I had to find out more about the phrase, so I immediately Googled it. It turns out that Anushka Sharma is either a huge fan of The Handmaid’s Tale, a popular T.V. show on Hulu, or she’s just really into old school Latin jokes. If you haven’t read my previous article on The Handmaid’s Tale, I suggest you take a few seconds to do so now by clicking on the link attached to “The Handmaid’s Tale”. According to Vanity Fair, like the phrase “nolite te bastardes carborundorum”, the phrase “illegitimi non carborundum” is another fake Latin phrase. It has more or less the same meaning as “nolite te bastardes carborundorum”, which is “don’t let the bastards grind you down.

If that wasn’t enough, I also stumbled onto Anushka Sharma’s husband’s Instagram account (keep in mind that I was pretty bored at this point). OH BOY. Her husband, Virat Kohli, a well-known Indian cricketer had the phrase “Carpe diem” as his Instagram bio. Below is a screenshot of it.

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Woah. Now, the first thing that irked me was that Carpe diem was written as one word. And, if that wasn’t enough, he had a link right below it to promote an online clothing company. And, to put the cherry on top of all of that, Kohli forgot to complete the phrase! Yes, you heard that right, “Carpe diem” is NOT the whole phrase. According to Brittanica, “Carpe diem” is just the beginning of a phrase from Horace’s Odes, and the whole phrase can be translated as “pluck the day, trusting as little as possible in the next one.”

Now, I’ve always been told that “Carpe diem” means “seize the moment”, but the whole thing about not trusting the future? I’ve never seen the phrase be translated and interpreted like that. Now, the question is, does Virat Kohli know the full phrase, or is he using a commonly-used phrase for his Instagram bio? And, does Anushka Sharma know that the phrase “illegitimi non carborundum” is a fake, joke phrase for Latin students? If they don’t, it’s alright. After all, Smart People Know Latin.

Is Pseudo-Latin Actually A Thing?

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Believe it or not, pseudo-Latin is a thing. In fact, you’ve probably already seen it. Lorem Ipsum is known as pseudo-Latin. Lorem Ipsum is a dummy text which is used to fill in documents and websites, so the viewers and editors can pay more attention to the format and layout. Today, a lot of websites and desktop publishing softwares use Lorem Ipsum to fill in blank spaces.  However, contrary to popular belief, Lorem Ipsum is not scrambled words and randomized text¹. The text in Lorem Ipsum originates from one of Cicero’s works. So, does that make Lorem Ipsum real Latin or pseudo-Latin?

¹ Even though Lorem Ipsum resembles Latin, the text has no meaning. The letters k, w, and z don’t exist in Latin, so similar words are inserted in their place.

 

Ghosting, Shadowing, & Latin

I’ve been playing tennis for a long time and just recently picked up squash. During tennis workouts, my coach used to say to shadow strokes before practicing them with tennis balls. This helps build your technique and gets your feet moving. During squash practice, my squash coach said the same about squash. She said, for a part of our warm-up, we’d be ghosting strokes because that helps build technique. At that moment, something clicked in my head; those two actions are essentially the same, right? In Latin, the word umbra, umbrae means both shadow and ghost. Is that a crazy coincidence or what?!