Lucifer and Lux

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I have recently started watching a T.V. show on Netflix. This T.V. show, called Lucifer, is about Lucifer, also known as Satan, in Los Angeles solving homicide crimes with the L.A. Police Department, specifically with a homicide detective. He ends up with this role because he is bored with being the Lord of Hell and wants to explore his morality. The show involves a Devil, therapist, and some very crude jokes. Lucifer has quickly managed to become one of my all-time favorite TV shows simply because the show manages to never become too dark. No matter what happens, Detective Decker’s young daughter, Trixie, and Lucifer’s strange reactions manage to brighten up the plot with their silly points of views. One episode involves the L.A.P.D. interviewing 93 of Lucifer’s hookups, all while Lucifer tries to prove to his partner that he wants to be romantically involved with her. God’s ex-wife also makes an appearance in the TV show and is ultimately punished by Lucifer to remain on Earth as a human.

However, no matter what happens, Lucifer always returns to his home: Lux. Lux is a popular nightclub that is built on prime real estate and is THE happening place to be at. The nightclub is paramount to Los Angeles’ nightlife and later on in the show, a crime is committed there. What many watchers don’t know, though, is that lux is Latin for light. This is very clever wordplay from the creators of the TV show, seeing how Hell, in Christianity, encompasses flames and eternal burning.

What’re your thoughts? Have you seen any Latin in TV shows (hint: you probably have)?

Photo Credits: We Got This Covered

What Do Instagram, Bollywood, And Latin Have In Common?

The other day, I was bored, so I went onto Instagram and searched up Bollywood actors. Among those actors, I searched up Anushka Sharma. I was dumbfounded when I read her Instagram “bio”. In the beginning part of it, she had a Latin phrase. Below is a screenshot of it.

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It reads “illegitimi non carborundum”. I knew I had to find out more about the phrase, so I immediately Googled it. It turns out that Anushka Sharma is either a huge fan of The Handmaid’s Tale, a popular T.V. show on Hulu, or she’s just really into old school Latin jokes. If you haven’t read my previous article on The Handmaid’s Tale, I suggest you take a few seconds to do so now by clicking on the link attached to “The Handmaid’s Tale”. According to Vanity Fair, like the phrase “nolite te bastardes carborundorum”, the phrase “illegitimi non carborundum” is another fake Latin phrase. It has more or less the same meaning as “nolite te bastardes carborundorum”, which is “don’t let the bastards grind you down.

If that wasn’t enough, I also stumbled onto Anushka Sharma’s husband’s Instagram account (keep in mind that I was pretty bored at this point). OH BOY. Her husband, Virat Kohli, a well-known Indian cricketer had the phrase “Carpe diem” as his Instagram bio. Below is a screenshot of it.

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Woah. Now, the first thing that irked me was that Carpe diem was written as one word. And, if that wasn’t enough, he had a link right below it to promote an online clothing company. And, to put the cherry on top of all of that, Kohli forgot to complete the phrase! Yes, you heard that right, “Carpe diem” is NOT the whole phrase. According to Brittanica, “Carpe diem” is just the beginning of a phrase from Horace’s Odes, and the whole phrase can be translated as “pluck the day, trusting as little as possible in the next one.”

Now, I’ve always been told that “Carpe diem” means “seize the moment”, but the whole thing about not trusting the future? I’ve never seen the phrase be translated and interpreted like that. Now, the question is, does Virat Kohli know the full phrase, or is he using a commonly-used phrase for his Instagram bio? And, does Anushka Sharma know that the phrase “illegitimi non carborundum” is a fake, joke phrase for Latin students? If they don’t, it’s alright. After all, Smart People Know Latin.

The Handmaid’s Tale

The Handmaid’s Tale is a TV series based off of a bestselling book. The book and series are similar in many ways. For example, there is a phrase, in the book, which is tattooed on womens’ bodies. In the TV show, the phrase shows up scratched near the floor. The phrase is “Nolite te bastardes carborundorum”, which doesn’t have a proper translation, nor is it a proper phrase. However, its direct translation is, “Don’t let the bastards grind you down”. According to Vanity Fair, the phrase goes way back. It’s been used as a school joke too; the author admits that it was a joke in her Latin classes. However, the origin of this made-up Latin phrase is the late 1890s. During that time, Carborundorum was a trade name and because most people don’t know that now, they assume it’s Latin.

Meaning of M.O.

In a lot of TV shows, the abbreviation M.O. is used to ask how the crime was committed. M.O. is actually an abbreviation from a Latin phrase. The phrase is Modus Operandi. Its translated as method or mode of operation. Method of operation is another way of saying/asking how the culprit committed the crime. Now, when you watch Criminal Minds, Law and Order, or any crime TV show, be sure to pay attention to the Modus Operandi!

References :

https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/modus%20operandi

http://www.dictionary.com/browse/modus-operandi